An analysis of ozymandias by percy shelley

These lines also contain some of the most vivid and beautiful imagery in all of poetry. Near them are the remains of a stone face — evidently part of a statue — and the face bears a superior, grim expression.

Ever the political critic, Shelley is perhaps warning the leaders of England that they, too, will fall someday. He can tell that the sculptor must have known his subject well because it is obvious from the statues face that this man was a great leader, but one who could also be very vicious: These lines also contain some of the most vivid and beautiful imagery in all of poetry.

However, one survivor beside Ozymandias' words is the sculptor's skill: Historical Analysis of Ozymandias It is an understatement to say that Shelley was a clever man. Near them on the sand, Half-sunk, a shatter'd visage lies, whose frown And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamp'd on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed; And on the pedestal these words appear: What is clear is the contempt held for the arrogance of this ruler Ozymandias, for his hand mocked and his greedy heart fed on the people, and only the sculptor's great skill remains to record these things.

Given its status as a great poem, a few words by way of analysis might help to elucidate some of its features and effects, as well as its meaning — what exactly is Shelley saying about great empires and civilisations? Shelley met and fell in love with a young Mary Godwin, even though he was already married.

If anyone would know how great I am and where I lie, let him surpass one of my works. The rulers of the world, "ye Mighty," are told by Ozymandias, "king of kings," to look upon his works and despair of emulating them. Ozymandias I met a traveller from an antique land, Who said: It has fallen, much like the statue, and has turned to dust.

Both poets remove the city of Thebes, the site of the statue, from their poems for artistic purposes. Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Near them are the remains of a stone face — evidently part of a statue — and the face bears a superior, grim expression.

It is also easy to interpret that this ruler probably had a lot of pride as the supreme leader of his civilization. Shelley was such a masterful writer that it does not take much effort on the part of the reader to clearly imagine the scene in this poem.

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Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed: First, his hands show that the pharaoh mocked his people, yet his heart was not all bad: From this, he is able to tell that this ruler probably had absolutely power, and he most definitely ruled with an iron fist.

It has fallen, much like the statue, and has turned to dust. On the pedestal are inscribed the words "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Overall, this sonnet paints a picture of an egotistical character who thought himself without rival but who was cruel to his people.

With Tutorfair you can browse through a selection of great tutors to find the right one for you.An analysis of one of Percy Shelley’s most famous poems Published in The Examiner on 11 January‘Ozymandias’ is perhaps Percy Bysshe Shelley’s most celebrated and best-known poem.

Given its status as a great poem, a few words by way of analysis might help to elucidate some of its features and effects, as well. Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley Prev Article Next Article Here is an analysis of Ozymandias, a poem written by one of the greatest Romantic poets in history, Percy Bysshe Shelley.

Analysis of Poem

Apr 08,  · Mr Beasley teaches the poem Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley. Percy Bysshe Shelley and Ozymandias Ozymandias is a fourteen line sonnet written in by a British Romantic poet whose name is synonymous with radical social and political change. Percy Bysshe Shelley lived a chaotic, nomadic life but managed to produce poetry and pamphlets for most of his adult years.

Percy Bysshe Shelley | Source Percy Bysshe Shelley and Ozymandias Ozymandias is a fourteen line sonnet written in by a British Romantic poet whose name is synonymous with radical social and political change. Ozymandias is one of the most anthologized poems written by the English poet Percy Bysshe Shelley.

It is a sonnet, first published in The Examiner in The next year, it got a place in Shelley’s collection Rosalind and Helen, A Modern Eclogue; with Other Poems ().

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An analysis of ozymandias by percy shelley
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